Mangroves, Mangroves. Rhizophora. Avicennia. A Photo

Table of contents:

Mangroves, Mangroves. Rhizophora. Avicennia. A Photo
Mangroves, Mangroves. Rhizophora. Avicennia. A Photo

Video: Mangroves, Mangroves. Rhizophora. Avicennia. A Photo

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: Avicennia marina Gray mangrove तीवर Mangrove biodiversity series 2023, February
Anonim

The Caribbean coastline, the Taiwan Strait and other tropical ocean coasts are invariably home to unusual coastal vegetation. As if escaping from the excessive crowding on land, these trees on peculiar roots-stilts rush to the very shore, and some even invade the seething waves of the ocean.

These are mangroves, mangrove thickets. They are somewhat reminiscent of the flooded forests common in our lower reaches of the Volga, Kuban, Dnieper and Dniester rivers during strong spring floods. At this time, they seem to float among the water width. Like our flooded willows, sometimes flooded to the very tops of the spring waters, mangrove trees bathe their spreading crowns in sea water. But the time of low tide passes, and the waves, rolling away far, gradually reveal the underwater forest. Only plentiful drops of water on the dark green leathery leaves remind of their recent stay under water. At this time, you can see the most daring mangrove inhabitants in full glory. They stand densely on their bare dark brown stilts. Due to the large amount of tannin, the wood of the most common tree in the thickets is blood-red rhizophora.The locals therefore call it mahogany.

Image
Image

Rhizophora trees also occupy the front line of mangrove forests, which penetrate deeply into the depths of the sea. The second strip is mainly formed by Avicennia trees, followed by woody plants: lagularia, banisteria and other species.

The adaptability of these trees, especially the Rhizophora and Avicennia, to unusual conditions is amazing. The coastal strip, now flooded, then released during the ebb and flow, has a muddy soil saturated with salty sea water through and through. There is no air at all in this mess. But the inhabitants of the mangroves have adapted and settled in such unusual conditions.

Mangroves
Mangroves

Rhizophora, first of all, attracts attention with stilted roots extending from the main trunk and branches and going deep into the muddy soil. Such roots often reach a height of 10 meters.

The method of reproduction of rhizophores is also peculiar. These trees are viviparous. Their ripe fruits do not fall from the tree, as is the case with most plants, but remain hanging on the branches until a single seed of the fruit germinates. Rhizophores, hung with fruits that resemble our pears, but attached to the plant with the back side, represent an entertaining sight. These fruits germinate with their "tails", forming the roots of a new plant. Roots grow by 60-70 centimeters from hanging fruits, sometimes gaining strength within 6 months. They seem to be waiting to separate from the mother tree at the most favorable time. It is noteworthy that the separation of a young plant, as a rule, coincides with the ebb tide. Fully formed plants, breaking away from the mother tree,rush down and pierce deeply into the soil that has just been freed from water. This is how the independent life of a new generation of rhizophores begins. Young settlers are fixed by roots growing into the ground for several hours. They are usually no longer afraid of a new tide: by this time they have time to securely gain a foothold and start growing. If some plants fall to the ground late and are caught by the tide, they are well prepared for such vicissitudes of fate, since they can perfectly swim without loss, rushing around the water expanses of the ocean for several months. They often travel long distances and settle far from their homeland, quickly settling in new, favorable conditions for them.Young settlers are fixed by roots growing into the ground for several hours. They are usually no longer afraid of a new tide: by this time they have time to securely gain a foothold and start growing. If some plants fall to the ground late and are caught by the tide, they are well prepared for such vicissitudes of fate, since they can perfectly swim without loss, rushing around the water expanses of the ocean for several months. They often travel long distances and settle far from their homeland, quickly settling in new, favorable conditions for them.Young settlers get fixed by roots growing into the ground for several hours. They are usually no longer afraid of a new tide: by this time they have time to securely gain a foothold and start growing. If some plants fall to the ground late and are caught by the tide, they are well prepared for such vicissitudes of fate, since they can perfectly swim without loss, rushing through the water expanses of the ocean for several months. They often travel long distances and settle far from their homeland, quickly settling in new, favorable conditions for them.since they can perfectly swim without loss, rushing around the ocean for several months. They often travel long distances and settle far from their homeland, quickly settling in new, favorable conditions for them.since they can perfectly swim without loss, rushing for several months across the water expanses of the ocean. They often travel long distances and settle far from their homeland, quickly settling in new, favorable conditions for them.

Image
Image

© Itsmine

Mangrove forests in a short time form dense thickets, protecting the shores from the destructive action of sea waves. At the same time, they are capable of continuously advancing on the sea, gradually conquering new territories from it. The densely woven roots of the rhizophores and avicennias, rising above the ground at first, catch silt and sand from day to day, continuously delivered by waves. Gradually, the level of these areas rises and eventually goes beyond the sea. True, the arboreal inhabitants of mangroves, being spoiled by warm sea baths, do not want to lose their aquatic environment and, in turn, move towards the outgoing sea. Old, dead trees densely cover the coastal territory, and at this time the rhizophores are already conquering new frontiers in the struggle against the sea. Often lands reclaimed from the sea, most of them very fertile,the population uses citrus, coconut and other valuable crops to create plantations, and charcoal is burned from dead trees.

Mangroves are a favorite habitat for seagulls, frigates and many other birds. In contrast to the calm twilight of our forests, mangroves are always filled with the sound of waves and the voices of restless representatives of the tropical fauna.

Mangroves would be very useful to us - reliable protectors of the sea shores, but they need the permanent warmth of tropical waters. Our scientists in Leningrad, harsh for the pampered tropics, are already carrying out experimental work on the creation of such forests under a glass roof.

Links to materials:

S.I.Ivchenko - Book about trees

Popular by topic