Evening Primrose For The Lazy Gardener. The Best Views. Care. Photo

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Evening Primrose For The Lazy Gardener. The Best Views. Care. Photo
Evening Primrose For The Lazy Gardener. The Best Views. Care. Photo

Video: Evening Primrose For The Lazy Gardener. The Best Views. Care. Photo

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Video: Growing evening primrose 2023, February
Anonim

Primroses are plants ideally suited to the concept of a "lazy" garden. They are unpretentious, undemanding to care, can settle even where, it would seem, primroses have no place at all. Equally beautiful leaves and flowering are a nice bonus for plants that can be planted and forgotten. True, to say that they grow by themselves is not possible about all primroses, and their fragility imposes its limitations. But there are many species that allow you to create beautifully flowering accents, making it easier to care for the garden as a whole.

Primroses in the garden
Primroses in the garden

Content:

  • Primrose description
  • 16 types of primroses to look out for when creating a hassle-free garden
  • A relentless parade of unpretentious primroses in the garden
  • Features of caring for unpretentious rams
  • Choosing the right conditions for primrose is a guarantee of success

Primrose description

Sheep, little keys, primroses - do not name them as charming primroses, they will not lose either their charm or beauty from this. Plants, the origin of which is surrounded by legends and stories, never go out of fashion. And the point is not at all that primroses are among the first to appear on the garden scene, delighting with a wide variety of colors in late April and early May, even in regions with harsh winters. The primroses are strikingly diverse, yet exhibit an amazing commonality in nature.

Of the more than six hundred species of primroses that are found on almost all continents and in different climatic zones, only about six dozen species of primroses are recognized as ornamental plants. But species of plants today are less and less common: they are being ousted from the "market" by various hybrids and varieties, often even of unknown origin, which boast amazing flowering characteristics and improved shape of individual flowers and inflorescences.

If you are looking for plants that would help you create a garden that requires minimal care, then you need to pay attention first of all not to fashionable varieties, but to species primroses - the most hardy, undemanding and content with rare care.

All primroses are so special that they are very easy to distinguish even in a large collection of species in a flower garden. But still, garden primroses have much more in common.

First, primrose leaves almost always stand out easily against any background. They may differ in shape, but they are necessarily collected in a root rosette, rich green, lighter than most perennials and uniquely velvety.

Secondly, flowers, collected in inflorescences of various shapes, are also easily recognizable by the texture of the petals and dazzling bright colors with an "eye".

Common primrose "Carrigdale" (Primula vulgaris 'Carrigdale')
Common primrose "Carrigdale" (Primula vulgaris 'Carrigdale')

16 types of primroses to look out for when creating a hassle-free garden

Common primrose (Primula vulgaris) is a plant whose appearance is well known to most gardeners. Oval, velvety, bright leaves up to 25 cm long are collected in neat rosettes and partially preserved for the winter. Peduncles up to 20 cm high are crowned with single flowers up to 4 cm in diameter. Along with simple light yellow or white plants with a purple spot, there are double, semi-double and simple variably colored varieties. In favorable weather, this species blooms very profusely, almost overlapping the foliage with flowers, is capable of re-flowering.

High primrose (Primula elatior) is one of the most attractive and unpretentious primroses with an umbrella-shaped inflorescence. It is no coincidence that it has become a favorite of landscape gardens and natural "wild" plantings: being the most drought-resistant and amazingly hardy, the tall primrose demonstrates enviable constancy. Its leaves are elongated-oval, up to 20 cm in length, collected in a beautiful rosette. Peduncles up to 35 cm high are crowned with an umbrella bent to one side of two centimeter fragrant flowers, decorated with a bright light or dark spot.

Primula rosea (Primula rosea) is another umbrella-colored star that appears on the scene immediately after the earliest primroses in the first half of May. It is a moisture-loving species capable of adapting to conditions not only on the banks of ponds or streams. Delicate, with dazzling pink flowers, just over 1 cm in diameter, this primrose conquers with its almost invisible at the beginning of flowering and gradually growing peduncles, the length of which reaches 15 cm by the end of flowering. Only after flowering, the leaf rosette grows intensively, surprising with elongated oval leaves that change color from bronze to pale green.

Spring primrose (Primula veris) will not yield to any competitor in the beauty of inflorescence umbrellas. This is not the most catchy, but also the least demanding type of primroses for keeping conditions. Its main advantage is considered to be very early flowering, which begins literally after the snow melts. Leaves are ovoid, showy, wrinkled, up to 20 cm long. The flowers are unusual, with an elongated light tube and heart-shaped corolla petals, collected in one-sided clusters of inflorescences. The palette of colors includes unique shades of cream and pink. This plant is also a valuable medicinal and even edible crop (its leaves can be added to salads).

Primula high (Primula elatior)
Primula high (Primula elatior)
Primula pink (Primula rosea)
Primula pink (Primula rosea)
Spring primrose (Primula veris)
Spring primrose (Primula veris)

Primula auricula (Primula auricula), also known simply as auricula, like all hybrids obtained on its basis, is a beautiful appearance with dark evergreen oval leaves up to 20 cm long and flowers up to 3 cm, famous for the variability of the color of varieties: as a rule, in the ear primroses combine circles of three or four different colors, and the classic yellow eye is combined with all possible bright shades of the color spectrum. Despite the fact that her flowers are also collected in umbrellas, from a distance they seem to be floating blooming spheres. This primrose blooms in early or mid-May.

Alpine primrose (Primula alpicola) - one of the most beautiful primroses with racemose inflorescences. Dense basal rosettes of oval, up to 10 cm long leaves with a fine-toothed edge are transformed when the plant produces half-meter peduncles with fragrant flowers up to 4 cm in diameter.The flowers adorn with a bright eye on a purple, light yellow or lilac corolla. This plant is very pleasantly surprised by its sweet, honey aroma.

Sikkim primrose (Primula sikkimensis) also forms clusters of inflorescences. It blooms only in mid-summer, in late June-early July, offering to add its touching, but bright accents to the powerful flowering of perennials and the incipient flowering of roses. The plant is not pubescent, which is a great rarity for primroses, it seems elegant in everything: both by its spatulate-lanceolate leaves, collected in graceful fountain-shaped high rosettes, leaves, and thirty-centimeter peduncles, at the top of which in umbrellas there are hanging light yellow bells in several tiers flowers.

Primula ear (Primula auricula)
Primula ear (Primula auricula)
Alpine primrose (Primula alpicola)
Alpine primrose (Primula alpicola)
Sikkim primrose (Primula sikkimensis)
Sikkim primrose (Primula sikkimensis)

Florinda primrose (Primula florindae) is a spectacular bell-shaped primrose with a lacy appearance, it is considered a late-flowering species that blooms last, but this statement is not entirely true: Florinda blooms from mid-June, but the last flowers on it keep in August. Unlike the Sikkim primrose, the plant is covered with a powdery yellow bloom. Peduncles above 1 m in height are crowned with long-tiered umbrellas of small bright yellow, fragrant bell-shaped flowers. The leaves are very large, bright, and look very unusual.

Primula capitate (Primula capitata) is one of the plants, the appearance of which is easy to guess by the name. The lilac-colored bell flowers are collected in unusual flattened balls of inflorescences, and the mealy bloom that covers the entire plant only emphasizes the texture of long leaves, peduncles and buds.

Small-toothed primrose (Primula denticulata) will appeal to fans of capitate primroses. Its inflorescences, similar to floating balls, look great in mixed beautifully flowering compositions of flower beds, rabatki, landscape groups, and the leaves, from a compact outlet after flowering up to 40 cm in length, contrast surprisingly effectively with their neighbors. But still the most beautiful thing about the plant is not the dazzlingly bright leaves, but dense balls of purple, lilac or white inflorescences, which at first almost lie on the ground, and then gradually rise to a height of 25 cm on growing peduncles.

Florinda primrose (Primula florindae)
Florinda primrose (Primula florindae)
Primula capitate (Primula capitata)
Primula capitate (Primula capitata)
Small-toothed primrose (Primula denticulata)
Small-toothed primrose (Primula denticulata)

Primula Bulley (Primula bulleyana) is one of the most unusual species of primroses. This is a candelabra primrose with very large leaves, reaching 40 cm in length, and almost the same in width, dying off for the winter. Yellow-orange flowers about 2 cm in diameter are collected in tiered inflorescences and rise to a half-meter height. This bright primrose blooms in June-July, often growing as a biennial, which is replaced by self-seeding.

Viale Primrose (Primula vialii), or primrose Orchidaceae begins to bloom in June and July. But it is not the summer flowering that attracts so much in this plant, but its extraordinary appearance. Actually, this primrose is not at all like primroses. In the middle lane, lanceolate leaves with a light bluish color appear only at the end of May, and the flowering is not so massive, but our plant also perfectly reveals its beauty. Unusual inflorescences-sultans up to 7 cm high with red buds and lilac flowers at the bottom resemble luxurious pyramids. This species is considered problematic in regions with severe winters, but when planted in the company of tall herbaceous perennials and provided self-seeding is preserved to replace plants, this exotic primrose will fit into the concept of a "lazy" garden even better than most "our" primroses.

Japanese primrose (Primula japonica) also boasts non-standard flowering. This species blooms only in June, as if picking up the flowering wave of May species. The leaves of the plant are large, lanceolate-oval, collected in a beautiful, but somewhat sloppy rosette. But the candelabra of her inflorescences are dazzling. On half-meter peduncles, ring-shaped whorls of crimson or white flowers about 2 cm in diameter are relentlessly blooming.

Primula Bulley (Primula bulleyana)
Primula Bulley (Primula bulleyana)
Primula Viale (Primula vialii)
Primula Viale (Primula vialii)
Japanese primrose (Primula japonica)
Japanese primrose (Primula japonica)

Voronov's primrose (Primula woronowii) blooms as early as the spring primrose, as soon as the last snowdrifts melt. Short and very delicate, it surprises with light lilac petals that fade towards the center and a bright yellow eye, wrinkled-sloppy leaves that seem especially delicate in spring.

Primula Julia (Primula juliae) - one of the early flowering species, traditionally emerging on the garden scene at the end of April, a little later than the spring primrose and Voronov. But she became famous, first of all, for unpretentiousness and shade tolerance. Leaves are ovoid, light, set in rosettes on rather long petioles. The flowers seem large and showy, up to 3 cm in diameter, they flaunt a deep groove on the petals and a fairly long tube. This primrose blooms before the leaves begin to bloom, often capable of weak re-flowering. The color palette ranges from purple and lilac to white, red, yellow in all possible shades.

Powdery primrose (Primula farinosa) will delight with flowering in late spring. This primrose does not have such large leaves, only up to 5 cm in length, but they are collected in very dense rosettes and are covered with an intense, whitish powdery bloom. Peduncles up to 20 cm high with bright pink-lilac flowers with a white eye in a loose inflorescence seem weightless. This view will pleasantly surprise you not only with its character, but also with the preservation of leaves until winter and even until spring under the snow. But this primrose is very short-lived.

Primula Voronova (Primula woronowii)
Primula Voronova (Primula woronowii)
Primula Julia (Primula juliae)
Primula Julia (Primula juliae)
Powdery primrose (Primula farinosa)
Powdery primrose (Primula farinosa)

A relentless parade of unpretentious primroses in the garden

Even from among only these unpretentious favorites among primroses, you can create a whole baton of continuous flowering, which will cover the entire period of active growing season from April to the end of summer. The primrose parade is opened by the spring primrose, by the end of April, the primrose of Voronov, Julia and the high join it, in May the relay passes to pink, ear and common primroses, and by the end of the month all attention is turned to the mealy primrose.

Only in June, the Japanese primrose will sparkle with the beauty of the inflorescences, and by July the primroses of Viale, Florinda and the Sikkim will also join them, and the primrose of Florinda will delight until mid-August.

In terms of the possibilities of using in the design of the garden, these types are completely unmatched. For example, you can always use the classic placement options for certain types of primroses:

  1. the primroses of Voronov and Yulia will find a place in mixborders, borders, in the foreground of flower beds, on alpine hills and even rockeries;
  2. Japanese, Sikkim and Florinda primroses will become the best decoration for reservoirs and water bodies - ponds, streams, etc., as well as swampy beds and places with high humidity;
  3. fine-toothed primrose will not be lost in any flower garden in the company of perennials and flowering shrubs;
  4. spring primrose will happily create colorful spots on the lawn.
Primroses in the garden
Primroses in the garden

But primroses can be used not only as indicated above. They will find a place both on the lawn, and in ridges or mixborders, to create color accents, on the edges, they can be planted as masking plants, fillers, "spots" and arrays, and even used as potted plants.

Where and how you use primroses, the main thing is to remember that the easier it will be to grow them, the larger the group you can place them. It's not just that primroses like a close enough planting - such that there is no free soil between the outlets. Placing primroses in groups of 5-7 plants, you will get a bright spot that practically does not require care and attention, you will reveal the beauty of not only flowering, but also the leaves of these plants.

For a "lazy" garden, it is worth choosing the right for primroses and partners, given that planting with the most spectacular plants will not make it easier to care for the composition as a whole. Primroses go well with small-bulb and bulbous that do not require digging, which grow without leaving at all - muscari, non-varietal daffodils, etc., perennial violets and saxifrages, cereals, irises, hosts, ferns and rogersia.

Features of caring for unpretentious rams

Primrose care is amazingly simple. These plants just need a few procedures:

  1. Weeding and loosening the soil or replacing both points of care with mulching the soil (you can even use ordinary loose soil at least about 3 cm high).
  2. Watering when planting in dry soil or in a sunny place in drought.
  3. Top dressing in early spring, if there is time and desire - three times per season (after the snow melts, after 2-3 weeks and in July-August).
  4. Separation of bushes every 3-4 years.
  5. Shelter for the winter with a layer of dry leaves to protect against snowless periods and temperature extremes (layer up to 10 cm).
Primrose of different varieties
Primrose of different varieties

Choosing the right conditions for primrose is a guarantee of success

In order for primroses to really become plants for the lazy, to fit into the concept of intelligently saving time and creating compositions that require almost no maintenance, they need to be very carefully selected growing conditions.

First of all, one must not forget that all the primroses described above are not shade-loving cultures, but shade-tolerant, and certainly moisture-loving. For primroses in the garden, any semi-shady, secluded areas with fresh, sufficiently moist soil will be an ideal place (damp - only for species that are used in the design of a reservoir). You can also grow primroses in the open sun, but only if you don't want to create a sustainable garden.

After all, the brighter the lighting, the more plants will have to be watered, they will fade in just a few days and the foliage will not decorate a flower garden or a rabat, which means that their true beauty will not be fully revealed. It will be necessary to wait until the primroses can again become a decoration of the site until autumn, when the growth of leaves will resume again and under very favorable weather conditions, you can even count on re-flowering. But if you plant primroses in partial shade, for example, under openwork trees and shrubs, then they will look good from the start to the end of the garden season.

It is better to pay more attention to the quality of the soil. The soil should be both loose and qualitatively permeable, but not overly light. For primroses, soils that are heavy and compacted or that cannot hold water are not suitable - neither clay nor sandy soils without additional improvement. But loams and sandy stones, especially if organic and other improving additives are added to them before planting, are ideal for primroses.

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