False Strawberries. Ducheney. Indian Cinquefoil. Berry. Flower. Photo

Table of contents:

False Strawberries. Ducheney. Indian Cinquefoil. Berry. Flower. Photo
False Strawberries. Ducheney. Indian Cinquefoil. Berry. Flower. Photo
Video: False Strawberries. Ducheney. Indian Cinquefoil. Berry. Flower. Photo
Video: What's In Your Yard: Mock Strawberry 2023, February
Anonim

Indian cinquefoil (Potentilla indica) is a type of herbaceous plants that outwardly resemble strawberries with leaves and false fruits. Although many reference books refer the plant to the Duchesnea genus isolated from the Potentilla genus (for example, on the Germplasm Resources Information Network), genetic studies show that the plant is more correctly attributed to the Potentilla.

Indian cinquefoil (Potentilla indica)
Indian cinquefoil (Potentilla indica)

The name itself comes from the Latin word 'potens' - which means strength, power, it used to be very important, since the plant was used in large quantities in folk medicine. The genus itself is very extensive and has over 300 species, most of which are distributed in the northern hemisphere.

The plant can be distinguished by its yellow colors (in real strawberries - white or light pink). It grows in East and South Asia, but was introduced to many other countries as an ornamental plant. In a number of regions it has gone wild and become a weed.

Indian cinquefoil (Potentilla indica)
Indian cinquefoil (Potentilla indica)

Potentilla belongs to the Rosales order of the Rosaceae family. The plant is characterized by increased aggressiveness and vitality. Almost all types of Potentilla reproduce independently with the help of whiskers, which very quickly creep over the soil, occupying rather large areas of the site. Therefore, if you decide to have this wonderful plant in your summer cottage, then you need to take care of the timely removal of the mustache …

Perennial invasive and wild ornamental plant with aerial creeping shoots, rooting at the nodes. Internodes up to 12 cm in length. Creeping leafy stems, 30-100 cm long, dressed as petioles and pedicels with protruding hairs, sometimes with an admixture of pedunculated glands, subsequently turning red.

Basal leaves are numerous, long-petiolate, trifoliate, dark green, often preserved in winter; stem leaves on shorter petioles; stipules ovate-lanceolate, entire, at the upper stem leaves incised herbaceous; leaflets on petioles, wedge-obovate or rhombic, up to 2-3 cm wide, crenate-toothed, protruding-hairy on both sides. The flowers are light yellow, 15-20 mm in diameter, on long and thin pedicels, set in mid-spring, and then irregularly during growth.

Indian cinquefoil (Potentilla indica)
Indian cinquefoil (Potentilla indica)

The outer sepals are leaf-shaped, 3-5-toothed or lobed at the apex, bent back after flowering. Filaments of stamens are long, anthers are ovoid. Fruits are small, numerous, located on an oblong-ovoid fleshy bright red fruit; is like strawberries. Each fruitlet contains on average 190 small fruitlets.

Fruits are white or red, completely covered with red seeds. The fruits are edible but tasteless. Seeding - from late May to mid-November.

Indian cinquefoil reproduces by seed and vegetative means. During vegetative propagation, cut sections of aerial creeping shoots are planted, which after 10-15 days take root, grow quickly and completely cover the soil. Sections of creeping shoots are planted in rows or scattered.

Indian cinquefoil (Potentilla indica)
Indian cinquefoil (Potentilla indica)

Indian cinquefoil is a remontant plant, blooms from mid-April to August-September, but massive blooms in late May. Leaves under the snow with red "berries". Mass ripening of seeds at the end of July. The readiness of the fruit collection is determined by the ripe dark red receptacle, which is easily separated by this time. The "false berry" is dried indoors, the achenes are easily separated from the receptacle, the germination of seeds is well preserved for the 2-3rd year.

Cinquefoil is a plant with intensive growth of shoots, in some cases, in the 2nd year of life, the shoot length per season reaches 160-180 cm. The graceful stolons of this plant are able to quickly capture large spaces and throw over obstacles, forming rosettes of leaves in weight.

Cinquefoil grows well on fairly moist, loamy and sandy loam soils; also tolerates slightly saline and solonetzic soils. Indian cinquefoil behaves almost like an evergreen plant. The most intense regrowth of aerial shoots begins in early March.

It is good to create covers from this plant in parks, squares, on rocky uneven areas.

Synonyms

  • Fragaria indica Andrews - Indian strawberries
  • Duchesnea indica (Andrews) Focke - Indian Duchesnea

Popular by topic