My Maiden Grape Varieties Are Decorative And Docile. Description. Photo

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My Maiden Grape Varieties Are Decorative And Docile. Description. Photo
My Maiden Grape Varieties Are Decorative And Docile. Description. Photo

Video: My Maiden Grape Varieties Are Decorative And Docile. Description. Photo

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Video: Столовые сорта винограда. Часть 1. Сезон 2018 (Table grape varieties. Part 1. Season 2018) 2023, February
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Maiden grapes can be found today in literally every vacant lot. But not every gardener will decide to invite irrepressible girlish grapes to his small plot. And many even have to fight the vine, like a malicious weed. However, Polish and American breeders have made the maiden grape desirable again, giving its leaves an extraordinary color and taming its willful temper. I will tell you about the most decorative and completely non-aggressive types and varieties of maiden grapes that grow on our site in this article.

My maiden grape varieties are decorative and docile
My maiden grape varieties are decorative and docile

Now it is difficult to remember who and why came up with the idea of ​​calling the maiden grapes "wild". Perhaps the reasons for this lie in the unbridled nature of this vine, which is growing at a staggering speed. Or maybe the rumor decided that this is a natural variety of cultivated varietal grapes. However, the scientific name for "wild" grapes is Parthenocissus, and it is a completely independent genus of the grape family.

Content:

  • The best varieties of maiden five-leaf grapes
  • Other decorative types of maiden grapes
  • Features of growing maiden grapes

The best varieties of maiden five-leaf grapes

Girlish grapes "Starfall"

In this handsome American selection, it is far from immediately possible to identify the familiar girlish grapes. The variety has an extraordinary variegated color, as if a skilled artist painted it with yellow-green strokes, making each leaf truly unique. In autumn, with the onset of cold weather, pleasant pink tones also appear in the color of the carved leaves.

The size of the leaf blade of Star Showers grapes is approximately half that of the species Partenocissus, making the vine look delicate and weightless. Like most plants of the grape family, the flowers of this plant are unremarkable, but in the fall they are replaced by blue-black fruits, which look very expressive against the background of painted leaves, attracting many birds to the autumn garden.

This maiden grape variety is suitable even for small garden plots, since it grows much slower than its wild counterpart, and even at a venerable age, its height does not exceed 5-8 meters. In addition, regular haircuts will help keep the vine in line.

The plant can be safely stirred on arches and obelisks, allowed to wrap around pergolas and gazebos, and, of course, be planted against the walls. In addition, maiden grapes can also be used as a groundcover, creating bright spots at the foot of trees and tall shrubs.

The originators attribute this variety to 4-9 frost resistance zones, and this means that there should be no problems with the wintering of this variety in the middle lane. However, practice shows that it is better to remove young plants from the support in the first couple of years so that they overwinter under the snow. After the vines get stronger, the maiden grapes winters without any problems. Sometimes, in severe winters, the ends of the shoots are frozen over in some plants, but such damage is insignificant, and the vines quickly recover.

From time to time, shoots with normal green leaves appear on Star Showers grapes. Such reversible vines grow faster than variegated vines and must be removed in time so that they do not spoil the decorative effect of the plant.

Star Showers in spring
Star Showers in spring
Star Showers in summer
Star Showers in summer
Star Showers in autumn
Star Showers in autumn

The maiden grape Troki, or "Red Wall"

Often found in garden centers under the trade name Red Wall ("Red Wall"). This variety of Polish origin is characterized as a robust liana with bright foliage that retains its attractiveness from spring to autumn.

In early spring, immediately after budding, the plant becomes covered with bronze leaves, which change to dark green as it grows and adorn the vines from the beginning of the season to the end of summer. And, finally, in the fall, the plant "changes clothes" again, acquiring an extremely spectacular outfit of bright red color.

The foliage surface of this type of parthenocissus is glossy, the shape of the leaf blade is five-lobed. It should be noted, however, that this variety creates a dense covering of vertical surfaces, like ivy.

If in a natural species of maiden grapes the length of the vine can eventually reach 20-30 meters, then the stems of the Red Wall variety are rather modest in size. At 10 years old, their length is approximately 7.5 meters. And the annual growth of the plant is only 1-2 meters. Although the fruits of this vine are not particularly spectacular, the birds love them and continue to feed on small berries throughout the winter.

The maiden grape Troki, or "Red Wall"
The maiden grape Troki, or "Red Wall"

Divich grapes "Yellow Wall"

Most types and varieties of maiden grapes are famous for their autumn color with a predominance of crimson and wine-red tones. But the variety Yellow Wall, bred by Polish breeders, is unique in that with the onset of cold weather, its foliage turns bright yellow.

In summer, the leaves of this variety have a familiar dark green color, but their size is an order of magnitude smaller than that of the wild-growing form, and the leaves are so densely arranged that they resemble tiles, tightly covering the surfaces of the branches. The maximum length of lashes at the age of 20 is 14 meters. However, the growth rate of the Yellow Wall variety is also significantly reduced, so it is not difficult to control the size of the vine.

In landscape design, the atypical autumnal color of this wild grape variety can be perfectly beaten, using it as an independent element. In this case, an arch or pergola entwined with an unusual liana "suddenly" becomes golden with the arrival of autumn. Or you should try to combine the Yellow Wall with traditional crimson varieties. Then such a duet will undoubtedly add extraordinary expressiveness to the garden.

Divich grapes "Yellow Wall"
Divich grapes "Yellow Wall"

Other decorative types of maiden grapes

In addition to the main species - the five-leafed maiden grape (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) and its popular varieties - in the landscaping of cities and household plots, you can find a number of other equally interesting varieties of parthenocissus.

Girlish grapes attached

Attached maiden grapes (Parthenocissus inserta), at first glance, are not so easy to distinguish from five-leaf grapes. The lobed leaves of this grape also consist of five segments and have a glossy surface with a uniform green color. But if you take a closer look, you will notice that the serrated edge of its leaf blades has larger notches, due to which the liana looks more carved from afar.

The autumn color of the attached parthenocissus also includes predominantly red and purple tones. This vine differs from the main species, including its size. At the age of ten, its height does not exceed 3–5 meters.

Like most varieties of ornamental grapes, this plant is quite winter-hardy, has little demand for growing conditions and does not require special care. Like all its relatives, attached maiden grapes are able to easily cover and decorate large vertical areas: walls of houses, outbuildings, high fences and tree trunks.

Engelman's maiden grape

Engelmann's maiden grape (Parthenocissus Engelmannii) is not so much an independent species as a variation of the five-leaf parthenocissus with increased shade tolerance and some external differences. In particular, its leaves are more miniature in size, and the serrations along the edge of the leaf are more distinct and slightly rounded. The foliage surface is not glossy, like in five-leaf grapes, but is more matte and has a slight pubescence.

By the way, the Star Showers variety described above was bred on the basis of Engelmann's parthenocissus. This type of ornamental grape is less aggressive (in terms of growth), more graceful and has a moderate growth - its maximum height at the age of ten is close to 9 meters. The annual growth rate is relatively small - 1.5 meters.

With regard to decorativeness, the most significant difference between Engelmann's maiden grapes is autumn color. With the onset of autumn, the foliage of this vine acquires an unusual two-tone color, combining yellow and red-orange colors.

Such a color looks especially original in comparison with the usual monochromatic species and varieties. The use of the girlish Engelman grape in design is similar to most similar vines: decorative trellises, obelisks, fences, walls of buildings and so on.

Henry's maiden grape

The maiden grape Henry (Parthenocissus Henryana), originating from Central China, is a truly rare plant that has not become widespread due to its low winter hardiness. Moreover, the appearance of this southerner is really exotic. The dark brown shoots of the liana are decorated with medium-sized dense five-lobed dark green leaves, the central veins of which are distinguished by a silvery color, and the reverse side of the foliage has purple hues.

Thanks to such a multicolored combination, with gusts of wind, the liana seems to constantly change color. Unfortunately, in the middle lane, this species can be grown only by providing the plant with a solid winter shelter. Therefore, due to the increased thermophilicity, the girlish grape Henry is used, mainly in landscaping cities in the Crimea and on the Black Sea coast of the Caucasus.

Female grape attached (Parthenocissus inserta)
Female grape attached (Parthenocissus inserta)
Engelmann's maiden grape (Parthenocissus Engelmannii)
Engelmann's maiden grape (Parthenocissus Engelmannii)
Five-leafed maiden grape (Parthenocissus quinquefolia)
Five-leafed maiden grape (Parthenocissus quinquefolia)

Features of growing maiden grapes

All types and varieties of maiden grapes are unpretentious, and they are quite easy to grow on any type of soil without any special care. Usually, parthenocissus is recommended to be planted in well-drained soils, but in practice the plant thrives in areas with a high groundwater table. It is believed that the vine even serves as a kind of pump, consuming a large amount of soil moisture.

Parthenocissus will grow equally well both in the open sun and in partial shade. However, the vines growing in sunny places have the brightest autumn color. Variegated forms in well-lit areas are also brighter.

Maiden grapes are best planted initially in those places where they will have enough room for growth and development. At the same time, vines planted near buildings require careful monitoring, since vines can attach to gutters, blinds or wires, causing damage to structures.

Care should be taken when placing decorative grapes near wooden or stone structures, because vines have tenacious "suckers" that will leave marks on surfaces and destroy the paint layer if you try to unhook the stems over time.

There is an opinion that the vines living on the walls do not harm the building at all, but, on the contrary, protect it from the negative effects of precipitation, overheating and the destructive effects of ultraviolet radiation. In this case, the "suction cups" with which the vine is attached to the walls absorb moisture, preventing mold from forming.

The destruction of the foundations of buildings by the powerful roots of the vines of the maiden grapes can rather be attributed to prejudice. Ancient castles and historical buildings of Western Europe, covered with vines of parthenocissus, have been adjacent to similar plantings for centuries without much harm to buildings.

The fruits of maiden grapes are a favorite delicacy of birds. But keep in mind that these berries are also very easily soiled, and if they come into contact with light coatings, they can leave ink stains that are difficult to remove. Never eat parthenocissus fruits as they cause mild stomach upset.

Often in the non-chernozem zone, maiden grapes are damaged by recurrent frosts. But this does not affect the overall decorative effect of the vines, since the plant has many renewal buds and very quickly releases new leaves.

The most serious disadvantage of girlish grapes, in addition to "aggressiveness", some gardeners consider subtle, unattractive flowers. To compensate for this feature, in a company with a vine, you can plant a varietal or species clematis, the expressive flowers of which will form a harmonious duet with the dense dense foliage of the parthenocissus.

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