The Dragonfly Is An Air Wolf. Helicopter. Value. Beneficial Insects. Description. Photo

The Dragonfly Is An Air Wolf. Helicopter. Value. Beneficial Insects. Description. Photo
The Dragonfly Is An Air Wolf. Helicopter. Value. Beneficial Insects. Description. Photo

Video: The Dragonfly Is An Air Wolf. Helicopter. Value. Beneficial Insects. Description. Photo

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Video: Investigating the Secrets of Dragonfly Flight 2023, January
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As soon as the sun's rays caress the earth, dragonflies are among the first to fly into the air. Strong wings easily carry a slender graceful body, huge - up to 150 kilometers per hour - the speed and strength of the wings allows insects to quickly overcome inertia, make sharp turns and change flight altitude. Perhaps, this dragonfly has no equal among the six-legged …

Dragonfly (Odonata)
Dragonfly (Odonata)

This small medieval Japanese rhyme recreates a picture of a sultry summer, a scorching sun, a dazzlingly sparkling water surface and a myriad of insects scurrying over it. And the main characters among them are dragonflies. Behind their seemingly carefree and aimless rush, they have their own complicated life. Let's try to penetrate the secret of dragonfly flights lasting from dawn to dawn.

Try to carefully sneak up on an insect sitting on a blade of grass near the water and examine it. First of all, you pay attention to the huge, almost full head, eyes. It seems that they are about to converge on the back of the head. Large ear-to-ear mouth. As soon as the dragonfly opens it, the entire lower half of the head seems to fall off. But there is a deep meaning in all of this.

Striking in the dragonfly legs - long, thin, somewhat vaguely reminiscent of spiders. It is immediately evident that it is difficult for such a large insect to move on them, unless it is only to cling convulsively to a blade of grass in order to hang on it a little, until the weak legs are tired under the weight of the body … But since in nature everything is expedient, there is probably some sense in those ridiculous legs …

During the flight, the dragonfly weaves its tenacious legs into a trapping basket and keeps it at the ready, starting in pursuit of any winged insect. The dragonfly overtakes the victim, winds the basket from behind and, as it were, scoops up the six-legged. The head of the predator immediately descends into the basket, and the prey disappears behind a huge cupped lower lip. It is impossible to get out of this "tub". The dragonfly begins to chew on the move and does not slow down its flight speed. Even if a large insect comes across, the predator deals with it instantly. The jaws are still chewing, and the eyes are already fixing the new "game", and the wings themselves carry to it.

Dragonfly (Odonata)
Dragonfly (Odonata)

Mosquitoes, midges, flies, small and medium-sized butterflies, and sometimes quite large ones, turn out to be the prey of dragonflies, in general, almost all six-legged living creatures flying along the banks of rivers, streams, lakes and ponds, in the forests and gardens adjacent to them. But, of course, insects scurrying around water bodies get the most from dragonflies. Here, in the breeding grounds, there are especially many of these "air wolves".

Let's watch the dance of dragonflies over the water mirror. Some dive swiftly and, striking the water with their belly, soar upwards, so that they can then rush down again, others descend to the water in zigzags, and still others sit on a stalk sticking out above the water and dip the tip of the abdomen into the water. All these tricks and tricks dragonflies resort to in order to lay eggs in the water. Dragonfly life is unthinkable without water.

The eggs will lie there for the prescribed period, and the larvae will hatch from them. They are not very pleasing to the eye: brown-gray, long or noodle-like, with six thin legs, move along the bottom awkwardly, slowly, as if reluctantly. And these ugly, but water-dwelling larvae were called naiads …

However, you can peep interesting episodes from the life of the naiads and somewhat change your attitude towards them. Here the naiad stopped not far from the caddisfly lying at the bottom of the house. As soon as the "hermit" dared to look out, the dragonfly larva, throwing a stream of water out of the tip of the abdomen, like a rocket rushed towards him. From under the head of the naiad a harpoon-lip came out and plunged into the body of the caddis flies. Then the lip folded, and the body of the victim was at the very mouth of the predator.

Mollusks and small tadpoles, larvae of mosquitoes and flies and other, even the most nimble, small inhabitants of reservoirs are the prey of such clumsy-looking naiads. Indeed, it is difficult to expect a sharp throw from these sluggish insects and assume that they have a harpoon-lip - a weapon that is instantly deployed and strikes without missing. In the world of entomologists, this lip is called a mask: when folded, like a carnival mask, it covers the lower part of the face and chest of the naiad. And, of course, it masks the true nature of the larva …

Dragonfly (Odonata)
Dragonfly (Odonata)
Dragonfly (Odonata)
Dragonfly (Odonata)
Dragonfly (Odonata)
Dragonfly (Odonata)

Someday the naiad will want to leave their underwater kingdom. The insect will crawl onto a blade of grass rising above the water or climb onto a wet snag and firmly grasp the support. In the hot sun under a light wind, the skin of the naiad will tan, harden, stretch and burst along the back. From under the skin, an almost completely dragonfly head will appear, followed by a breast and still very little similar to real ones - wings.

The insect will begin to twitch, wriggle, lean back sharply, hanging head down. It will fight for several hours trying to get rid of old clothes. Finally, the abdomen will appear, and after it, like from stockings, truly dragonfly legs will appear from the naid legs. After this battle for beauty, the insect will come to its senses for a long time. But a moment will come, and the dragonfly will rush into the sky …

More than once, these beautiful, strong insects helped a person overcome the annoying midges that bite and clog in all cracks, protected the plants from a nun butterfly, meadow moth, scoop …

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