10 Most Unpretentious Perennial Flowers. Names, Descriptions, Types, Photos

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10 Most Unpretentious Perennial Flowers. Names, Descriptions, Types, Photos
10 Most Unpretentious Perennial Flowers. Names, Descriptions, Types, Photos
Video: 10 Most Unpretentious Perennial Flowers. Names, Descriptions, Types, Photos
Video: 300 FLOWER NAMES IN ENGLISH WITH PICTURES THAT YOU MAY FIND IN YOUR GARDEN 2023, February
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A beautiful garden that blooms throughout the season cannot be imagined without perennials. These flowers do not require as much attention to themselves as annuals, are frost-resistant, and only sometimes need a little shelter for the winter. Different types of perennials do not bloom at the same time, and the duration of their flowering can vary from one week to 1.5–2 months. In this article, we suggest recalling the most unpretentious perennial flowers. After all, they are not only beautiful, but also almost do not require any care from you.

10 most unpretentious perennial flowers
10 most unpretentious perennial flowers

1. Brunner

Blue inflorescence Brunner (Brunnera) bloom spring among the first, together with tulips and daffodils later. Light, delicate peduncles appear long before the arrows of young leaves emerge from the ground. After flowering, the foliage in some species dries out quickly, but the large-leaved brunner bushes retain their decorative appearance until frost.

Brunner large-leaved
Brunner large-leaved

Brunner likes to grow in partial shade, where more moisture is retained and there is enough nutrition for her lush foliage. But otherwise, it is unpretentious - it grows well both on forest soils and on loams, it can withstand 30-degree frosts and put up with a short-term drought. With a lack of moisture, Brunner leaves droop and lose their decorative effect, so you need to monitor the condition of the soil under its bushes.

Plants thrive and can thrive in one spot for many years. But over time, the bushes thicken, so it is recommended to periodically divide them. Brunner's flower garden is best combined with aquilegia, dicentra, Siberian irises, doronicum and primroses.

2. Aquilegia

In May, when the season of spring primroses ends, aquilegia comes to the fore in flower beds. We sometimes call this flower "eagles", and more often "catchment", for its ability to collect moisture on the surface of the leaves.

Aquilegia
Aquilegia

Beautiful aquilegia bells with simple or double petals are distinguished by a very original shape, with their characteristic spurs. They can be painted in a variety of colors - white, blue, purple, burgundy, yellow, golden orange, they can also be two-colored.

Aquilegia is considered one of the most unpretentious perennials. She feels equally well in the sun and in the shade, can adapt to any soil and conditions. A plant that has grown from an accidentally thrown seed will grow between concrete slabs even without watering.

Lush bushes of the catchment area with beautiful openwork leaves on thin petioles look very decorative even after flowering. These flowers are suitable for group plantings, they can also be placed in the background of flower beds or on an alpine slide.

3. Perennial asters

There are more than 500 species of perennial asters (Aster), which differ in terms of flowering time. In the spring in the gardens you can see the Anders and Alpine aster, in the summer the Frikara aster, Italian and stone -leaved, bloom. But the most popular among gardeners enjoy the autumn asters, which we have often called sentyabrinkami or oktyabrinkami.

Italian aster
Italian aster

Dense branchy bushes, strewn with numerous small flowers, stand out brightly against the background of the autumn garden. And even after the first frost, asters continue to bloom, although not as abundantly as at first. From pozdnetsvetuschih species best known asters New England, novobelgiyskaya, heath and scrub.

Perennial asters prefer the sun or partial shade, grow well on light, humus-rich soils and do not tolerate stagnant water. If the place is chosen correctly, the bushes begin to grow rapidly, so they need to be transplanted every 3-4 years.

Compact undersized varieties of asters are suitable for flower borders and alpine slides. Bushes of medium height look interesting in a company with cereals or low conifers. Well, tall asters, of course, are best planted in the background of a flower garden or used as a screen covering an unsightly fence or wall.

4. Irises

These flowers are often called "cockerels" or "iris" in our country, and they are so familiar to the eyes that they seem to be the natives of the garden. Irises (Іris) really belong to the old-timers, because they were introduced into the culture more than 2 thousand years ago. Over such a long time, many varieties and hybrid forms have appeared that are strikingly different from their wild relatives. Modern varieties of irises are magnificent, they never cease to amaze with the play of colors, grace and beauty of lines.

Bearded iris
Bearded iris

Most irises are rhizomatous plants, but there are species that multiply by bulbs. All of them are quite unpretentious, easily tolerate both frosty winters and long periods of summer drought. These flowers love the sun, but can grow in partial shade, especially in the southern regions.

Almost all irises prefer loose nutrient soil, but they do not tolerate stagnant water. It is recommended to plant them on an elevation, and the rhizome should not be too deep. And only marsh iris grows well in moist soil, so it is most often planted near water bodies. All types of irises do not react well to organic fertilizing, so it is better to fertilize them with ash or mineral fertilizers with a minimum nitrogen content.

Irises feel great in any company. They can be used both in single plantings and as part of various flower beds. The bright petals of irises attract everyone's attention during the flowering period, and their xiphoid leaves retain their decorative effect throughout the season and complement flower arrangements.

5. Peony

Peony (Paeonia) is one of the first among perennials for the beauty of flowers. Its lush buds bloom in May-June and delight with their splendor and aroma for about 2 weeks. But if you pick up varieties with different flowering periods, then you can admire them for almost two months. However, peony bushes look luxurious even without flowers, and by autumn they acquire a pleasant bronze or chestnut shade.

Peony (Paeonia)
Peony (Paeonia)

These flowers can grow in one place for a very long time, and the old bushes almost do not need watering. The main thing is to choose the right place for landing. The peony loves the sun, it can grow in partial shade, but in very shaded places of flowering, you can not wait. Plants thrive on light, well-drained soils filled with mineral fertilizers and compost.

Peonies in the garden look good in the form of single bushes. They can also be planted in rows near paths or in the background of a flower garden. These flowers coexist well with physostegia, daylilies and tall inflorescences of decorative onions. In the intervals between the bushes, you can place early spring bulbs - muscari, tulips, daffodils, crocuses.

6. Chamomile garden

Nivyanik (Leucanthemum), or Garden chamomile, is a favorite flower of Russian gardeners. It is appreciated for the delicate beauty and grace of inflorescences, as well as for abundant and long flowering. In nature, there are more than 30 species of this plant. Most often, in the gardens you can find the common cornflower, as well as the magnificent cornflower with large inflorescences, reaching a diameter of up to 8 cm.

Nivyanik (Leucanthemum), or Garden Chamomile
Nivyanik (Leucanthemum), or Garden Chamomile

The largest daisy is no less decorative, which is distinguished by long flowering - from July to the very frosts. Based on these species, breeders have created many interesting varieties with simple and double flowers. Among them there are undersized (up to 30 cm), medium-sized (60-70 cm), and some reach a height of up to 1 m.

It is not difficult to grow chamomile, it reproduces by seeds and dividing the bush. Plants can stay in one place without transplanting for at least 5 years, they are not demanding on the soil, and they respond well to fertilizers. Chamomile easily tolerates drought and even the most severe frosts.

Plants can be planted individually or in groups, included in mixborders and various garden compositions. Low-growing varieties of daisy are best suited for border plantings.

7. Echinacea

It is very similar to chamomile echinacea (Echinacea), which appeared here quite recently, in the 80s of the last century. In the homeland of the flower, in North America, about 10 different species grow. But most often in the gardens you can find Echinacea purpurea, known for its healing properties.

Echinacea (Echinacea)
Echinacea (Echinacea)

Currently, there are many cultivars of Echinacea with simple and double, multi-tiered flowers, the shades of which vary from pure white to chestnut. Plants can reach a height of 120-150 cm, but there are also medium-sized varieties, the height of which does not exceed 60-70 cm.

Echinacea can be considered a problem-free flower, because it is not afraid of rain, wind and frost, is not affected by diseases, is undemanding to the soil and almost does not need fertilizers. This flower feels bad only on poor sandy soils. New plants can be easily grown from seed, but hybrid forms are best propagated by root cuttings or by dividing the rhizome.

Echinacea looks best when planted in small groups, however, it is also good as part of a mixborder. Medium-sized varieties can be used for curbs or planted in the foreground of a flower garden.

Read more about the cultivation of echinacea in the article Medicinal Echinacea.

8. Lupine

Florists who grow lupine (Lupinus) in their gardens love it for its bright beauty and unpretentiousness. The luxurious racemose inflorescences of lupine can be painted in different colors - from white to purple and deep red. Their flowering lasts almost a month, and sometimes also again at the end of summer. The bright green, finger-like leaves on long petioles are very decorative throughout the season.

Lupine (Lupinus)
Lupine (Lupinus)

Lupine is undemanding to the soil, it can grow in any garden plots, but with increased acidity, the soil must be limed every few years. Plants thrive both in the sun and in partial shade. With good care, lupine grows into a powerful bush, sometimes flower stalks can reach a height of up to 1.5 m.

Landscape designers willingly include lupine in flower arrangements. It looks good both in single landings and in the background of mixborders. In a flower garden, lupine can coexist next to hosts, daylilies, irises, delphinium, poppies and astilbe.

9. Rudbeckia

A real godsend for novice gardeners - it rudbeckia (Rudbeckia). She belongs to those cultures that can be planted and forgotten. Plant care is simple: removing weeds, pruning faded inflorescences, watering during dry periods. These flowers prefer sunny places, but are undemanding to the soil, they can grow on any type of soil.

Rudbeckia
Rudbeckia

There are about 40 types of rudbeckia, among them there are both annuals and perennials. Modern varieties delight with their color range - from pale lemon to various shades of brown. The core of the inflorescences is most often painted in dark colors. Rudbeckia bloom begins in July and lasts until frost.

Rudbeckia is ideal for a natural garden. It goes well with monarda, paniculate phlox, echinacea, asters, liatris. In a company with cereals, rudbeckia acts as a soloist, clearly standing out against the background of openwork panicles and spikelets. Some rudbeckia varieties can grow up to 1.5 m in height, so they are best planted in the background.

10. Phlox

One of the most common flowering plants - it phlox (Phlox). The genus includes about 40 different species, but in our gardens you can often find paniculata phlox, subulate, splayed phlox and Drummond phlox. The first three species, which are perennials, tolerate winter cold well, are distinguished by abundant and long flowering.

Phlox (Phlox)
Phlox (Phlox)

Low-growing phlox species bloom in May-June, when the primroses have already departed, and the annuals are just gaining strength. They form large bright glades and are best suited for decorating alpine slides, curbs, rabatoks.

At the end of June, paniculata rush to replace low-growing phlox. Their lush bushes with large inflorescences of all kinds of shades - from white to dark purple - bloom all summer, and sometimes in early autumn.

These flowers thrive better on loose and fertile soils, provided there is sufficient moisture. If feeding is carried out regularly, phlox bloom very luxuriantly and brightly. They can be planted in open areas or where there is little shade. On hot summer days, under the protection of trees, plants suffer less from drying out of the soil.

Phlox care consists in removing weeds, periodic watering and top dressing. If necessary, the bushes are treated for pests and diseases.

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